Raising Compassionate Kids

girl and kitten PAIDHow to raise kids who are kind and considerate is a hot topic these days. With so much bullying happening in the world, both in schools and via the Internet, it seems more important than ever to raise kids who can be thoughtful and empathetic towards other people.

Children have an inborn capacity for compassion. Although you can take steps to raise a compassionate child who is kind to others yet strong enough to stand up to hurtful words and actions when necessary, the most important thing to remember is that children may listen to what we say, but they model themselves on how we behave. This means that if you practice and demonstrate compassion (with yourself, your child and the other people in your world), your child is very likely to emulate that behavior.

Here are some ideas to help you integrate compassion into your everyday life in ways that you can share with your child:

Volunteer. Show your child that all people deserve kindness by serving together at a soup kitchen or volunteering with Habitat for Humanity. Let your child choose a volunteer activity that builds on interests they already have (for instance, the Humane Society if they love animals or reading aloud to the blind if they love to read).

***If you live in the Atlanta/Dunwoody area, check out The Packaged Good, where you and your kids can decorate and personalize care packages and create craft projects for people in need.

Get a pet or a small plot of dirt to cultivate. When a child is invested in the care of another living thing, they learn about nurturing themselves and others and are less likely to engage in bullying. And most pets and plants require time outdoors, so you’ll both get a good dose of fresh air!

Practice listening and allow feelings. I always tell parents that only a “hurting” child hurts others. When your child is hurting, instead of responses like “keep your chin up” or “big boys don’t cry,” invite your child to share his or her feelings. Particularly with younger children, hug them to provide soothing reassurance that it’s okay to experience and express feelings of distress. When you help them heal their hurts by allowing them to fully express their feelings, it will be easier for them to listen to others with an open and compassionate heart.

Limit time with video games and television showsespecially those with even mild violence. Numerous studies have shown that media violence promotes aggression and desensitizes kids to the consequences of violent behavior.

Experience a neighborhood or part of town (or even another country) very different from your own.  Try a restaurant in a different neighborhood or take in a festival where people have a different culture, language and music. Experiencing diversity shows a child that differences can be both interesting and fun!

Activities that promote compassion mean you’ll be bonding with your child in ways you can both feel good about. In addition, activities like volunteering or growing a garden serve another purpose–they remind both of you that you have something valuable to offer the world. Your child’s growing self-respect can help turn the tide of bullying and the devastating effect that this has on children’s lives.

♥♥♥ LOVE IN ACTION ♥♥♥ 

Choose one of the activities above and implement it this week. Then keep adding to your “active compassion” list as you become more and more intentional about modeling compassion and kindness.  Remember, your kids are watching you!

“We must become the people we want our children to be.”  Joseph Chilton Pearce

Author’s content used under license, © Claire Communications

Speak Your Mind

*