Summer Family Vacations — what to do with all that togetherness!

vacation PAIDSummer vacations with the family can be the best of times or the worst of times. Confining airplanes or exhausting hours together in the car, boring hotel rooms or funky cabins on muddy lakes and six straight days of rain – family vacations can make you wish you had chosen a “staycation” instead!

On the other hand, exploring new places together, sharing leisurely time and goofing-off for days at a stretch, meeting new people or reuniting with loving relatives – family vacations can be the best thing since summers were invented.

If you’d like to have more of the best of times and less of the worst, here’s 5 tips to increase your odds:

  1. First of all, watch out for great expectations. Your own and the kids’. Enjoy the surprise of the vacation as it unfolds. This doesn’t mean don’t make plans. By all means, do make plans. And include everyone in the planning. Maps, brochures, photographs, share them all beforehand so that everyone knows what’s possible. Make check-lists, too, with responsibilities for everyone. And then hold those plans lightly so that unexpected adventures and spontaneous fun can be part of the mix too.
  1. Allow plenty of time, don’t jam-pack days or crowd too much into the trip. If you’re traveling with young children or toddlers, take short jumps instead of long leaps. If you’re driving, stop often, get out and stretch, move around. Consider picnics instead of restaurant meals.
  1. Keep it simple. Don’t schedule so many activities that there’s no time for just hanging out. Build in rest-time, too. Tempers have a tendency to flare when everyone’s packed together day and night for long stretches of time. Create alone time, for you and the children. Everyone needs recharging. Remember, both boredom and over-stimulation can result in acting out–so strive for balance.
  1. Keep a log or scrapbook to record your family vacations and take it along with you on each trip.  You can spend a few minutes at the end of each day recapping that day’s adventures and toss in any momentos, like ticket stubs, photos, tic-tac-toe games and pressed flowers.  Believe me, the few minutes you take to record your impressions while they are fresh will gift you with cherished (and detailed) memories when your kids are grown.
  2. Be sure and allow a day or two for re-entry before you go back to work and the children return to their summer routine. Coming home can be as stressful as leaving. Plan some space for a relaxing re-entry and make homecoming part of the vacation, too.
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